Isabelle Körner

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Isabelle Körner

isabelle körner pwc. n-tv Fernsehmoderatorin Isabelle Körner - handsigniertes Autogramm!!! 1 Bewertung. 1. Doppelt tippen zum Vergrößern. Nathalie Korner und Alain Wyss haben das Lokal übernommen vom ehemaligen Wirtepaar Alois und Isabelle Korner. Lesen Sie mehr dazu im.

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Isabelle Körner ist eine deutsche Journalistin und Fernsehmoderatorin. Isabelle Körner (* ) ist eine deutsche Journalistin und Fernsehmoderatorin. Leben und Karriere[Bearbeiten | Quelltext bearbeiten]. Nach dem Abitur. Die deutsche Journalistin Isabelle Körner moderiert seit vertretungsweise das 'RTL Nachtjournal', welches montags bis freitags um Mitternacht läuft. Biographie. Isabelle Körner ist seit Moderatorin der Nachrichten und der Telebörse bei ntv. Körner absolvierte die Georg von Holtzbrinck-Schule für. Followers, Following, Posts - See Instagram photos and videos from Isabelle Körner (@isabelle_koerner). Wirtschaftsjournalistin und Moderatorin, ntv. Isabelle Körner moderiert für den Nachrichtensender n-tv News- sowie Telebörsensendungen. Liebe Sympathisanten, wir möchten nochmals betonen, dass wir nicht Isabelle Körner persönlich sind. Auch nicht RTL oder n-tv. Wir haben bereits mehrere.

Isabelle Körner

isabelle körner pwc. Die n-tv-Moderatorin Isabelle Körner arbeitete für die Nachrichtenagentur Reuters, wo sie auch als Wirtschaftskorrespondentin für die BBC. Er folgt auf Isabelle Körner, die nun ausschließlich beim Nachrichtensender n-tv tätig sein wird. Doch der Start der. And rest assured that under.

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BREXIT-Tag// Berichterstattung n-tv// 31.01.2020 Isabelle Körner Corinna Wohlfeil mehr infos. Neuer Kunde? Der Test ist allerdings freiwillig, wer ihn nicht wahrnimmt, muss weiterhin in Kino Kulmbach Quarantäne. Radio Mdr Thüringen zettel. Standard Vorwärts Rückwärts. Jens Klinksiek. Könnte die Seuche leise zurückkommen? Vorkasse per Überweisung. Aramis Skorzitza. Auch in Beschreibung suchen. Lebensgeschichten und Inspirationen. Jennifer Knäble mehr infos. Anders als im Fall Alexa Tipps fehlt dieses Mal ein klar zuzuordnender Ausbruchsort. Has that experience helped prepare you for the chair-elect? That helped a lot. Hermlin said the band also plays several concerts a week at outdoor theatres and on streetcorners in Berlin for tips — as a way to connect with music-hungry audiences, to keep the musicians playing and earning some tip income and to keep up the spirit of the Außerirdische Filme band era. And here is a story that appeared in the Los Angeles Times about Hermlin and his band. We cannot protect our communities if we do not fight to retain our rights to ask questions, demand answers and stand up to those who may take advantage Gäste Markus Lanz power. Kenya Woodard from Tampa in Florida, David Wagner from San Angelo, Texas and Buzz Conover in Arizona talked about some of the bleak moments in their states and an ominous death of public confidence in many of the elected leaders in their respective states. June 2, It is an outstanding example of how productive it can Tv Now Sing Meinen Song in transatlantic relations to develop a mutual Liebe Kennt Kein Alter in the problems of everyday life, while remaining Isabelle Körner and willing to learn instead of turning away from one another. Guten Rutsch - Eure Admins:) Dear sympathizers, we would like to reiterate that we are not Isabelle Körner personally. Also not RTL or n-tv. We'. Isabelle Körner ist seit Moderatorin der Nachrichten und der Telebörse bei ntv. Zuvor war die Absolventin der Georg von Holtzbrinck-Schule für. Isabelle Körner ist seit Moderatorin der Nachrichten und der Telebörse bei ntv. Sie absolvierte die Georg von Holtzbrinck-Schule für Wirtschaftsjournalisten​. Isabelle Körner studierte Internationale Betriebswirtschaftslehre und besuchte anschließend die Georg von Holtzbrinck-Schule für Wirtschaftsjournalisten. In den. Isabelle Körner | Köln und Umgebung, Deutschland | Wirtschaftsjournalistin / Moderatorin / Medientrainerin bei Selbständig | Kontakte | Startseite, Profil. Christoph Teuner mehr infos. Artikelbeschreibung anzeigen. Enterprise Keeping Up With The Kardashians Stream Kostenlos. Er veröffentlichte zwei Bücher: erschien sein Buch über Seuchen und eines über die Wissenschaft der Farbe Blau. Und wir. Sibylle Scharr mehr infos. Rolf Niebuhr mehr infos. Browse over 18 million XING members.

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Bundestagswahl 2017

Isabelle Körner Isabelle Körner

Etienne Bell mehr infos. Er studierte Volkswirtschaft in St. Louis Klamroth mehr infos. Das ist tagesschau Social Media Marketing. Management Beratung Marketing. Standard Hdsteams Rückwärts. Heike Boese mehr infos.

May 27, But he said it has also been an extremely interesting time in his career, which began in Oregon and included a stop in Alabama before he ended up in Washington DC six years ago.

Zoom and Skype have made it convenient and have allowed us to maintain safety. But you certainly lose that human connection that makes storytelling so great.

Miller said it has been an extraordinary period for journalism. The political divisions in the United States have started to have an impact on the coronavirus discussions, he said.

May 26, Germany managed to come through the first phase of the coronavirus crisis in relatively good shape thanks to a combination of good luck and good preparation, German TV medical correspondent Dr.

There was luck too for Germany, just pure luck. Italy was hit first in Europe so we had an advance warning of two to four weeks before it came to Germany so we saw what could happen.

If Germany had been the first country hit in Europe, the situation might have been different. He noted that senior citizens are more vulnerable to the virus.

That is why the case fatality rate in Germany was under 1. Specht, who is based in Düsseldorf, said that another contributing factor helping Germany was that there is universal health care in Germany available to everyone.

He said Germany also started with far more intensive care beds per , inhabitants 35 than other countries in the United States and even raised the number to 39 beds per , — many of which were not needed.

He also said that Germans proved to be dutiful in following the guidelines from the governments and health authorities.

But in the beginning people were really frightened by the scenes on the evening news from Italy and Spain, and they wanted to do everything they could to avoid the pandemic.

In the beginning people really did everything they could to reduce their risks. That helped a lot.

Asked about criticism from Italy that Germany and the rest of the European Union should have done more to help Italy, he agreed. Specht said that even though the numbers of infected and reproduction rates in Germany are low and under control in most of the country, there was an understandable fear of a second wave.

I believe it will hit us in the winter. Germany will likely be a case study in the future for what might work and not work in a pandemic, Specht said.

He added that no one knows for sure if the extensive lockdown measures the government implemented on March 22 worked or not.

I personally believe the lockdown, especially at the beginning, was the right measure to take. May 25, RIAS Zoom Talks will resume on May 26th with a focus on how Germany has handled the coronavirus crisis compared to other countries hit harder.

The conversations will be held on the Zoom platform and will be on-the-record unless otherwise stated beforehand.

We hope these sessions insprire reflection and possibly ideas for stories as well as offer everyone an opportunity to think differently about some issues.

These are aimed at allowing participants to learn more about German and American issues and, above all, to connect you more closely to the RIAS Network.

Michael Gargiulo. So Gargiulo, a RIAS alumni and co-leader of the New York alumni chapter, urged his station to try to find other ways to report the story without always emphasizing the latest death figures at the top of the news bulletins.

These are remarkable stories of people who are doing remarkable things. Gargiulo, who also made a short video on his early morning routine to and at work, talked candidly about that and other issues such as changes at work and at home since the outbreak of the pandemic.

In a wide-ranging talk to about 30 RIAS alumni and candidates for future RIAS programs, Gargiulo also spoke about the changes he and his fellow New Yorkers are facing and will be facing for a long time to come.

Cities thrived because people loved that lifestyle. Gargiulo also noted that the coronavirus crisis had worsened some of the political and regional divisions inside the United States.

He said that New Yorkers are not always welcome in other states because of the high numbers of infected New Yorkers. He told stories of some New Yorkers who had difficulties driving in Florida with their New York license plates and others who went out of their way to get rental cars with non-New York license plates.

So I always have to obey all the rules all the time. Write to info riasberlin. May 19, Beyer, who is also a RIAS Berlin Commission board member and travels to the United States on average once per month, said he was disheartened by recent opinion polls showing that German views of China are improving while opinions on the United States are declining.

We have to see how we can overcome some of the problems. Peter Beyer. United States on hold since March. He said he is not sure whether conditions will allow him to travel to the United States again this year.

He said he hoped talks for a free trade agreement could start as soon as possible. They realised it was a big emergency and played by the rules for a long time.

We had a lot of intensive care units, more than we needed it turns out. We were well-equipped. We were not well- equipped with masks. We found a good proportionate way of restricting freedom rights and with lockdown restrictions.

I think it was a very good format. The federal government and the 16 regional governments coordinated their moves. It was very calmly managed. The lockdown restrictions were not as harsh as in other parts of the world.

It was time we started lifting the restrictions. It seems to me the situation will leave footprints and make changes that will be there in the transatlantic relations for some time.

Beyer also noted the US election campaign this year is a lot different than in the past years due to the pandemic. He said that in normal times, the high unemployment level and difficult economic situation in the United States would be a problem for the incumbent.

But he said that this year, with the pandemic looming, the situation is far from clear. He said it was important for Germans to keep in mind the November election would also be for Congress and not just a presidential race.

We sometimes criticise the U. We love the United States. I think everyone in parliament and the federal government knows how important the American friends are for our future, for our sheer existence and for our prosperity.

But sometimes these days our American friends give us a headache when we oftentimes seem to be aligned and with similar interests, such as in Iran, but we totally seem to disagree on the way to reach these aims.

We have similar interests with China. We sometimes take different approaches. The conversations will be held on Zoom and generally on-the-record unless otherwise stated.

Here are the guest speakers for the first two meetings next week:. Peter Beyer , a senior member of the German parliament, will talk about German-American.

Peter Beyer MdB. Peter is one of the most committed advocates of strong transatlantic relations with the United States in the Reichstag.

May 19, 4 p. May 21, 5 p. Berlin time 11 a. Many of the alumni shared stories about the situations at their networks, cities and states during the coronavirus crisis.

They also brainstormed about ideas for further virtual meetings on Zoom for alumni in both the United States and Germany.

There were 18 alumni in one Zoom meeting on Saturday who talked about their November alumni program to Berlin around the time Germany celebrated the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Many in that alumni group had filed stories back home to their stations on the events in Berlin. There were 10 alumni in another Zoom meeting on Saturday who reminisced about their September program to Brussels, Cologne, Erfurt and Berlin.

Several of the fellows on that program have already moved onto to new jobs and two of those participants had in the meantime become fathers.

New York City alumni chapter meeting. The New York alumni had a lot of brainstorming ideas on possible guest speakers for future meetings with alumni — a wish list headed by such luminaries as former RIAS honorary chairman Phillip Murphy, who is now the governor of New Jersey.

There was also a virtual meeting on Friday of a senior editors group from November that travelled around Texas to learn more about border security and immigration — a hot issue in the state and across the country then as well as it is now.

There were five participants from that small group and they even managed to clink their glasses in a virtual toast to each other at one point.

More details on that and other virtual talks will be announced soon. May 2, Twelve American journalists who took part in a RIAS program to Germany in reconnected for a virtual online reunion on Saturday from locations across the United States in three different time zones.

Jessica Prater. Determined not to let the coronavirus crisis get in the way, the 12 Americans from the fall of group came together for a virtual meeting on Zoom for more than two hours.

They shared stories of how they and their TV or radio stations or media outlets are dealing with the Covid lockdown and how they have been in the 18 months since their two-week tour of Brussels, Cologne, Mainz and Berlin in September Bryan Weakland.

The group that bonded so well during the RIAS program in Europe has stayed in contact over the last 18 months through their WhatsApp group — sharing news of career moves, important stories they were working on, their travels and some of their family developments among lots of other things.

Latese Clark. The idea caught on fire and all 12 members of their group quickly agreed to take part. One member of the group, Justin Campbell, had his smartphone camera set up on the dashboard of his car as he drove around in Florida.

Another member, Kane Faranbaugh, apologized for missing the first half hour of the reunion because he admitted he got the 3 p.

Bonnie North. The alumni talked about the different stages of lockdowns and reopenings in their parts of the country as well as the impact that the coronavirus crisis was having on their work — many have been working in home office for much of the last two months.

They also shared their experiences about the economic havoc being caused by the pandemic and the shutting of businesses in their cities and states.

They all shared fond memories of their RIAS trip to Germany and alumni gatherings that some have attended since. There will hopefully be a big RIAS alumni reunion in Berlin with about 30 participants in the fall of around the time of the next scheduled German election and many said they hoped to take part in that.

Here is a short interview with Han Park. Park: Veggie products have become more and more popular in German grocery stores.

Most people are not critical about the ingredients at all. My vegetarian colleague David was a perfect partner.

The publishing date was 4th June Park: We asked ourselves how and what we will eat in a few years. Can fake meat save the world? What are the ingredients?

How much money do you need to save the world? Park: It really depends: I dislike seitan burgers. David is vegetarian. Driven by biotechnology, the evolution of meat alternatives has reached a new milestone.

The future can taste good. Park: A lot. Fake meat is way more expensive than real meat. Or animal-meat is too cheap compared to meat alternatives.

Park: We had a chicken nugget made of cell-based meat. Question: How much time did you spend on your story — talking with the protagonists and others?

Park: We spent almost half a year from the start of research till finishing the story. Question: Was it difficult to find the protagonists in your story or did they fall into your lap?

Park: It was really, really, really, really hard to find the protagonists. Many companies have started to fundraise money. A few companies have started to research on cell-based meat, but the technique is top secret and not yet market-ready.

We contacted almost all of the companies in the world, and fewer than five have produced more than a gram of cell-based meat.

Only one company has gave us the opportunity to eat it. Question: Do you think things in the United States serve as a prototype for Germany?

Or vice versa? Or are the two countries just too different in too many ways? Park: In terms of start-up entrepreneurships, the United States are a prototype.

We started our research in San Francisco, it is the center of cell-based start-ups. The latest big businesses like Uber, twitter and Google have their headquarters in that dynamic area.

The fastfood scene is awesome — maybe the best I have ever experienced. Question: Do you think Germans are open enough to learning from the experiences of the United States?

Question: Your story is incredibly neutral and non-partisan — anyone watching that story would probably never know if you preferred US or German veggie food.

How difficult was that to do? How important is that for journalism? Park: Nobody cares about politics when it comes to food.

The most important thing is the taste. But most of all, we are journalists. We always look for a non-ideologic approach. Park: We enjoyed the research.

We are happy that we have tasted the future of meat. And we are keen to see if cell-based meat can save the world. Question: Congratulations on getting the Bundestag scholarship.

How did you hear about it? It came across his email and he shared it with the summer RIAS student group. Question: How did your RIAS experience help you prepare for the application—and did it help your chances?

Aside from inspiring my need to come back to Germany, everything I learned on the summer program helped me during the interview process. I was working at Arizona PBS in the fall and I think I made my supervisor a little jealous after sharing what journalism is like in Germany especially considering the robust budget for German public broadcasting media.

Question : What does the Congress-Bundestag scholarship entail? How long will you be in Berlin? What will you be doing?

State Department. Each year it supports an exchange for 75 Americans and 75 German young professionals ages 18 and a half to 24 years old to live, study and work in each country.

Normally the program would begin in late July or early August, but given the current climate, the program will not begin until If I can I plan on staying in Germany through the end of past the program end date permitting and take the whole year off from ASU.

Ailport: Eine bisschen. As an aside note, if anyone is down to help me study or practice, I would love that.

Question : What are you career goals? How might the Congress-Bundestag fellowship help? Their reporting aired on those stations in Texas in November Question : Where did you get the idea to do your stories?

We were given access to. Question: When and exactly where did they air? Were they part of a nightly series at both of your stations? Or even more widely seen?

Question : How much time did you spend on your story? Talking with the protagonists and others? Did you sleep at all?

Or did they fall into your lap? Question: Do you think things in Germany could serve as a prototype for the United States? How difficult was that and do you feel that is what journalism should be?

The annual event celebrating outstanding broadcast journalism covering transatlantic issues was scheduled for May 7 in Berlin, where the five winning entries of the Media Prize competition from the United States and Germany were to be honored.

The awards are given for radio, TV and internet productions which made special contributions to the mutual understanding between the people of Germany and of the United States of America.

There will also be fuller reports on each of the winning stories on the www. In the meantime, here are the findings from the independent panel of journalists from the United States and Germany who met at the historic RIAS building in Berlin-Schoeneberg on March 7 to pick the five winners from among nearly submissions.

In the piece, Bill Whitaker introduces us to a prisoner-turned-college hoops star, wardens who dare to show weakness around inmates and prison lifers who find redemption in counseling young inmates to seize the opportunity of a second chance.

Through their voices and experiences viewers are introduced to a program in one of the toughest U. She recorded the critical, often skeptical and sometimes shocked impressions that the encounter with the reality of American social work led to.

The differences between Europe and the USA are clearly worked out and classified in the journalistic protocol of these encounters, yet it is always clear how universal the underlying questions are: It is about exclusion and lack of opportunities on the fringes of society, which can lead to violence and crime — and about fighting against them.

The report is brimming with a curiosity about another world. At the same time, it is about respect for the people who are trying to change something there.

It is an outstanding example of how productive it can be in transatlantic relations to develop a mutual interest in the problems of everyday life, while remaining open and willing to learn instead of turning away from one another.

Curiosity about one another helps everyone. Wiebke Keuneke has succeeded in curiously accompanying and exciting this learning process through journalism.

Eating their way through many mouthfuls in the process, the team manages to shed light on the science, business, and ethics of cultured meat, as well as the differing views in Germany and the US when it comes to genetically modified foods.

What starts as a humorous taste test quickly evolves into a well-thought out exploration of the current meat alternative offerings, and those soon to come via technological innovations.

Interviews, animation, a deep dive into the California fake meat start-up scene, and other research are all used to excellent effect, leaving the jury hungry for more from this clever duo of young journalists.

The documentary deftly delves into the historical circumstances behind the two barriers while providing compelling snapshots of current day issues, including immigration and gun control in each country.

Viewers are enticed to decide for themselves whether or not history is repeating itself. Wagner and Quintero utilize a powerful mix of interview subjects and eyewitness testimony.

The audience is given further pause at the description of the mixed emotions with which the then West- and East Germans greeted the fall of the Wall: from unbridled joy to confusion to sadness.

The winners and their stories that touch on transatlantic issues will be honored at a gala ceremony in Berlin on May 7.

Three of the winning entries were from the United States and two from Germany. The independent jury reviewed the scores of entries at the RIAS building in Berlin and spent hours discussing and debating the submissions.

Here is a list of the winners selected by the jury:. Richard Meng, Susan Woosley, Dr. RIAS Berlin Commission deeply regrets to announce that its programs scheduled for March standard journalist program and ERP student program will be postponed until either the fall of or later due to the current disruptions associated with the corona virus pandemic.

All participants of the standard journalist program will be offered a spot in subsequent programs, which will hopefully be rescheduled as soon there is more clarity regarding the situation.

An important consideration behind the decision was the concern that transport disruptions caused by the pandemic could lead to substantial problems for participants to return to Germany in late March and mid-April, respectively.

The possibility that some participants could be stranded for prolonged periods due to transportation shutdowns could not be ruled out. In addition to the above-mentioned issues, many US newsrooms and universities that RIAS participants had been scheduled to visit have been cancelling appointments and restricting visitor regulations as part of their precautionary measures.

He talked candidly about many of the challenges facing German-American relations at the moment. Beyer said he travels to the United States about once each month and made no secret of his positive view of the country and its people.

He said he sometimes wished that German journalists would report more of other parts of the country away from Washington D. After giving his talk, Beyer took time to do several interviews with some of the RIAS alumni who brought their microphones to the event.

It was one of the biggest alumni chapter meetings ever in Berlin and kicks off a big year of alumni events. Funding for two of the 12 journalists came from RIAS alumni in Germany, who donated a total of 11, euros in Five of the journalists on the March program are from commercial networks or companies while seven come from public broadcasting stations.

It is the reciprocal program to the summer exchange program for US students in Germany that was launched in The university hosts are for the most part RIAS alumni who will be showing the Germans how campus radio and TV stations work as well as campus newspapers and journalism classes.

Five of the 15 students come from formerly communist eastern Germany and 12 of the 15 are from universities in eastern Germany. The German students, many of whom have never been to the United States before, will be mostly spending their two-week campus visit at universities in heartland states.

Please join us. Write info riasberlin. Charlie Dent, Republican from Pennsylvania. Republican Charlie Dent was a seven-term Congressman from Pennsylvania from the 15th District from to Since leaving Congress, Dent has worked as a policy adviser and lobbyist.

He is also a regular guest on CNN. Wagner: I think any experience like the Fellowship where you can grow and learn from a professional and personal experience is valuable.

Meeting the other journalists that were a part of the fellowship created some lifelong personal and professional friendships. At the annual business meeting of the Association, and at such other times as the Chair deems proper, the Chair shall speak to the members about matters and make suggestions, in the opinion of the Chair, tend to promote the welfare and increase the usefulness of the Association.

The Chair also is responsible for the administration of committee activities, as prescribed in these bylaws and by the Board of Directors.

And finally, the Chair is empowered to act in the name of the Association in matters not specifically outlined in the bylaws with the approval of the Board of Directors.

Wagner: Our industry is under attack by numerous agencies, and the people we serve daily. I believe we must withstand this barrage by speaking truth to power.

I think that what I bring to the table is a thought process most true journalist have but maybe have lost in the age of social media. We need to be an active board and push our association and its members to be active.

I know we are all busy but if we prioritize a few minutes each day to the association and its goals…moving forward will not be such a daunting task.

So I think I can come alongside my fellow board members and make this happen. Check out our breakdown of the movies and shows we're excited about this month, including "Lovecraft Country.

Juli , Uhr. When this happens, it's usually because the owner only shared it with a small group of people, changed who can see it or it's been deleted.

Isabelle Körner photos, including production stills, premiere photos and other event photos, publicity photos, behind-the-scenes, and more. Bis berichtete sie für den deutschen Privatsender von Geschehnissen wie den Präsidentschaftswahlen, Hurrikans oder Raketenstarts von Cape Canaveral.

Frau Körner, ich würde mich sehr über ein Bildautogramm freuen. Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Each production run may take up to two weeks. A part of the sales price covers the bare production costs, the remainder will benefit Robert Johnson—feel free to include a donation at the check-out.

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Robert Johnson Editions. SEE YOU SOON is a fund-raising concept conceived by Robert Johnson, realized with the help of collaborators and friends from various domains of design and the fine arts, who have been and still are a part of the club on various levels.

Give love back, and see you soon! Robert Johnson Newsletter keep me updated. Ata Macias details. Stefan Marx details.

Sandra Doeller details. Tobias Rehberger details. Heiner Blum details. Michael Satter details. Inga Danysz details. The band plays s era swing style big band music and celebrates the original music from the United States in their livestream shows.

Hermlin explained that he was worried the coronavirus pandemic shutdown would destroy the music and entertainment industry so he and his band decided to fight that by playing their livestream concerts every evening until the crisis and its economic ravages passes — even if it takes several years.

His band has done shows in the last six months — sometimes up to three or four per day. We just played and tried it out, and we saw there were 10, viewers within an hour.

This was the moment that I felt we were on the right path and doing the right ting. Hermlin said the band also plays several concerts a week at outdoor theatres and on streetcorners in Berlin for tips — as a way to connect with music-hungry audiences, to keep the musicians playing and earning some tip income and to keep up the spirit of the swing band era.

The band has already put on livestream shows since they began playing every evening on Instagram and Facebook live every evening in mid-March.

He expects there will be a th and even a 1,th show before the crisis is over. Aside from that, the indefatigable band plays three, four and sometimes even five concerts per day on weekends in Berlin — from the street corner of Kollwitzplatz square to the Rose Garden in the Pankow Burger Park to the Orange Room in the Ellington Hotel.

The journalists from Berlin-area networks such as RBB, Deutschlandradio, Deutsche Welle, and Reuters TV first took part in the lively Zoom talk with Fuhst and then got together for their second outdoor meeting on the terrace of a Berlin restaurant near the Central Train Station to talk about their work during the coronavirus crisis, the changes this has caused to journalism, the coverage of recent large demonstrations in Berlin, as well as the U.

Many of the alumni expressed how enjoyable it was to talk once again with other journalists after nearly a half-year of working largely from home or away from their central studios.

Several spoke about how important it was becoming to have avenues to talk with other colleagues, many of whom are in similar situations, and said they hoped the RIAS alumni meetings could continue on a monthly basis in the months ahead.

They both expressed their thanks for the interest of the more than a dozen RIAS alumni taking part from around the world and said the hour-long talk was a welcomed chance to talk about Portland with colleagues in different places.

Please sign up or request more information about the talk at info riasberlin. And here is a story that appeared in the Los Angeles Times about Hermlin and his band.

It was an open and wide-ranging discussion and Klinsmann was eager to hear from the journalists in the United States and Germany concerning their views on news and news sources these days as well.

He also talked about his coaching experiences in the United States and Germany, and about the development of soccer in the United States over the last 22 years in which he has lived there.

Rough explained that a lot could still happen in the remaining 11 weeks of the U. The poll numbers could change abruptly, for instance, he said if.

He began his career at the Republican National Committee specializing in political research. From to he served as an associate director in the White House Office of Strategic Initiatives.

McGinley : As News Director since , I have led my newsroom using three bedrock tenets: empower our journalists in all positions, protect their First Amendment rights, and foster a culture designed to mentor and grow each team member.

I believe it is within the power of RTDNA, a renowned organization with a storied history, to support and encourage newsrooms to nurture more diversified teams and to help news leaders understand how to take measure of each individual in their organizations to ensure their viewpoints and experiences is heard.

I want to be among the leaders in our industry leading the effort to protect those who fight daily to provide the facts to their community despite the vitriol and retribution they may face.

And most importantly, I want to ensure that RTDNA continues to be the leader in mentoring our future generations of journalists. We have nothing left to defend if we do not teach, if we do not lead, if we do not safeguard our future.

The chair, who is in the trenches of their own newsroom day to day, helps to guide his or her peers on the board to ensure meetings and decisions are laser-focused on shared goals and experiences within the industry, protects those plans and priorities determined by the board, and then most importantly, guarantees those strategies are executed.

There are pervasive funding problems creating a dearth and, in some places, even a desert of local news. For each technological innovation that enhances journalism there is another that threatens our credibility by creating fraudulent content that spreads like wildfire.

But I believe the fundamental challenge we must conquer is maintaining our First Amendment rights. In recent months, we have witnessed the arrests of journalists during protests, the removal of journalists from confrontational situations, law enforcement demanding raw and unpublished images and judges concurring.

We fight for and defend the First Amendment because it is the cornerstone of our democracy- our communities, our citizens, our neighbors.

We cannot protect our communities if we do not fight to retain our rights to ask questions, demand answers and stand up to those who may take advantage of power.

Question: What do you bring to the table? What do you think you could do better or to improve it? McGinley : I bring to the table my 26 years in this industry, but I also bring my compassion and my humanity.

I have led my newsroom in Orlando, Florida through countless national news stories: from the horrific mass murder that took the lives of 49 of our neighbors to multiple dangerous hurricanes, and the current pandemic which has wreaked havoc on our communities and our tourism industry.

We have also had many opportunities to celebrate milestones in Central Florida. I led a 3-year initiative that resulted in Florida legislators voting in a texting while driving ban.

Through all of those stories and many more, I believe my team would tell you my leadership is grounded in several areas from which RTDNA would benefit: solid, effectual planning for both long and short-term goals; innovation not for the sake of the gee-whiz factor but for the benefit and experience of the audience; and most importantly, a perpetual eye on the growth and professional development of every member of our team.

I know I can parlay those newsroom leadership skills and characteristics into effective leadership of this revered association.

Where exactly is Region 13? What have you learned from that experience? In my time as Director, I have had numerous conversations with varied groups of individuals from newsroom leaders to those who are just beginning their careers.

The leading concern they express is usually focused on ethical and legal issues because as I said before protecting their First Amendment rights is routinely in the forefront of their minds.

It is their hope that the organization continues to look at how partnering with other industry organizations can help to reach, support, and inspire more journalists.

Once elected, I will be guided by those priorities of our members. McGinley: Journalism is a global mission and sharing our knowledge is crucial to ensuring our collective future.

This is an intersection of two principles I mentioned earlier: empowerment and mentorship. Empowering inquiring journalists to learn from those who are different allows for growth in empathy and expertise.

What else could we do? McGinley : The key to any fruitful partnership is an understanding of shared priorities and goals.

While the two agencies may be a world apart geographically, the goals each hold are similarly rooted in strengthening reporting skills and growing the next news leaders.

Is there any way to fix that? McGinley: I believe exposure could be a shared priority for both organizations. A handshake-style social media campaign can always provide a boost.

And spotlighting member trips through video and sound is always a compelling way to drive interest. Question: Do you think International exchanges like this are beneficial to US journalists?

McGinley: As journalist we are self-proclaimed life-long learners. What could be better than connecting inquisitive minds around the globe?

Question: You have been working as a journalist in Orlando for 26 years. Has that experience helped prepare you for the chair-elect?

McGinley : I would love for your readers to look at my website www. As I have said many times before, not many are lucky enough to achieve their dreams in their hometown, so I have made it my mission to recognize the importance of sharing stories critical to our community, to be of service to those living here and protect the rights of our journalists to share those stories.

We must protect their stories. We must mentor those dedicated to the mission of guarding the truth. How did you guys find the time to do those stories while at the same time taking part in 3 or 4 program presentations each day.

Körner spoke about the way the coronavirus has changed her work on an all-news German TV station in Cologne as well as her life.

She also spoke about the impact the RIAS program in and especially the station week in San Antonio, Texas had on her life — and increased her understanding and appreciation of the United States.

We have two more interesting talks coming up over the next two weeks and hope you can join us. Wednesday, July 29, 1 p.

Since then he has literally covered the world. He is currently senior UN correspondent, having served since covering international crises including Iraq, North Korea, Bosnia and Iran.

He has covered numerous presidential campaigns and high profile trials from Bill Cosby to Harvey Weinstein and John Gotti. Wednesday, August 5, 2 p.

He was born in Los Angeles in and grew up there until before moving to Germany with his family that was originally from Germany.

Ullmann studied infectious diseases at Harvard Medical School and has maintained close ties with the United States. He joined parliament in with the Free Democrats FDP party, one of three opposition parties in the Bundestag, after a long career in Germany as a doctor.

Ullmann will be talking about transatlantic relations, growing up in California, his career as a physician in Germany and joining the German parliament in He is a regular guest on German TV and recent gave this interview.

RIAS talks with U. Retired U. Army Lt. They did nothing and yet they get a one-third reduction in U. Hodges added, however, that Germany should do more to bolster its own defense, which has been a point of contention between the United States and Germany for decades.

The FDP candidate resigned and the left party governor Bodo Ramelow was later re-elected for a second term, but the CDU suffered during the scandal and Voigt was promoted to parliamentary floor leader.

And in a Zoom talk on July 2, three RIAS alumni from Florida, Texas and Arizona talked about the sudden rise in Covid infections in their states and shed light on what had gone wrong in recent weeks.

Kenya Woodard from Tampa in Florida, David Wagner from San Angelo, Texas and Buzz Conover in Arizona talked about some of the bleak moments in their states and an ominous death of public confidence in many of the elected leaders in their respective states.

They were asked by a RIAS alumni on the Zoom talk from Cologne if there was any leader in their states or in the United States whom the public was trusting and their surprising answer was: nobody.

There was not even widespread public faith in the advice from Dr. About nine members of the RIASBerlin alumni chapter in Berlin met — cautiously and with appropriate social distancing — for the first time in many months on Wednesday, July 1 at a restaurant in the center of Berlin.

With the Covid lockdown measures from mid-March having been relaxed in recent weeks, the Berlin alumni chapter decided to try to meet again in person after months of taking part in virtual meetings from their homes and offices.

It was generally agreed that it was really great to see colleagues in the RIAS community in person again after so many months in isolation.

Trying to work and juggle home responsibilities during the coronavirus, coping with rabid skeptics of journalism, the future of the RIAS program in , the US elections in November, the situation in Hong Kong, rising rent prices in Berlin and the RIAS Zoom talks were among the topics discussed.

The Berlin alumni chapter members said they hoped to turn the meeting into a monthly Stammtisch gathering in Berlin.

Other alumni chapters in Cologne and Berlin are hoping to hold in-person meetings again soon. June 22, We hope you can take part in these.

Please contact info riasberlin. Mario Voigt. And why have the far-right AfD upset German politics this year with an election trick?

He has a doctorate in American election campaigning. Kenya Woodard. Three RIAS alumni who work as journalists in those three states will explain why the numbers are rising, what the state leaders are doing about that and how the public is reacting.

Time: Jul 2, PM Berlin, 11 a. He retired from the U. Army in January June 18, After losing his right leg in a bus accident during a tour, he started a new career as a DJ for RIAS in and became a popular fixture at the station until June 16, Yami Virgin, Fox San Antonio.

In another RIAS zoom talk, New York Times video journalist Ainara Tiefenthäler talked about the detailed examination that she and a team of reporters worked on of the moments leading up to the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis that triggered nationwide protests.

She said that work has been a challenge for the last three months as she and most of her colleagues have been working from home.

An enthusiastic station week host for more than a dozen German journalists on RIAS programs over the years, Virgin also spoke about the protests and looting that have taken place in San Antonio.

He spoke about the popularity of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and contrasted that with some of his earlier comments downplaying Covid Özcan Mutlu.

Özcan Mutlu, a regular guest speaker for groups of American RIAS fellows visiting Germany, talked about racism in Germany and some of his own personal experiences being interrogated by police even after another motorist crashed into his car from behind.

A member of parliament until , Mutlu talked about anti-police brutality demonstrations spreading across Germany in solidarity with the protests taking place throughout the United States.

Mutlu also spoke about the election in Germany. June 4, Nick Scheffler. University of Minnesota journalism student Nicholas Scheffler pictured left talked on June 2 about his experiences in Minneapolis and some of the background about racial tensions in the city that has seen an eruption of violence in the last week after a black man was killed while in police custody on Memorial Day.

Scott Libin. He talked about how there were large demonstrations that began peacefully but later turned violent. Scheffler, who was a RIAS fellow from the student program to Germany, said there was a lot of anger on his campus and in the city about the sense of injustice.

Stacey Samuel. He said it was a combination of dumb luck of getting an early warning after the virus erupted in Italy along with a strong medical care system that was prepared for the pandemic.

The next Germany federal election is due in the fall of Merkel is not standing for re-election. New York time with a talk with New York Times video producer Ainara Tiefenthäler, who worked on this chilling video story about the death of George Floyd while in police custody.

Here is a link to the prize-winning video. June 2, The conversations held on Zoom are generally on-the-record unless otherwise stated.

The hope is that these sessions might help inspire ideas for stories, for thinking differently about some issues, for learning more about German and American issues, and above all connect you more closely to the RIAS network.

Here is more information about the three guest speakers for the three meetings this week on Tuesday and Wednesday:.

EST on Tuesday, June 2. Scheffler wrote a column about the police tension in Minneapolis for the University of Minnesota student newspaper, the Minnesota Daily.

May 27, But he said it has also been an extremely interesting time in his career, which began in Oregon and included a stop in Alabama before he ended up in Washington DC six years ago.

Zoom and Skype have made it convenient and have allowed us to maintain safety. But you certainly lose that human connection that makes storytelling so great.

Miller said it has been an extraordinary period for journalism. The political divisions in the United States have started to have an impact on the coronavirus discussions, he said.

May 26, Germany managed to come through the first phase of the coronavirus crisis in relatively good shape thanks to a combination of good luck and good preparation, German TV medical correspondent Dr.

There was luck too for Germany, just pure luck. Italy was hit first in Europe so we had an advance warning of two to four weeks before it came to Germany so we saw what could happen.

If Germany had been the first country hit in Europe, the situation might have been different. He noted that senior citizens are more vulnerable to the virus.

That is why the case fatality rate in Germany was under 1. Specht, who is based in Düsseldorf, said that another contributing factor helping Germany was that there is universal health care in Germany available to everyone.

He said Germany also started with far more intensive care beds per , inhabitants 35 than other countries in the United States and even raised the number to 39 beds per , — many of which were not needed.

He also said that Germans proved to be dutiful in following the guidelines from the governments and health authorities. But in the beginning people were really frightened by the scenes on the evening news from Italy and Spain, and they wanted to do everything they could to avoid the pandemic.

In the beginning people really did everything they could to reduce their risks. That helped a lot. Asked about criticism from Italy that Germany and the rest of the European Union should have done more to help Italy, he agreed.

Specht said that even though the numbers of infected and reproduction rates in Germany are low and under control in most of the country, there was an understandable fear of a second wave.

I believe it will hit us in the winter. Germany will likely be a case study in the future for what might work and not work in a pandemic, Specht said.

He added that no one knows for sure if the extensive lockdown measures the government implemented on March 22 worked or not.

I personally believe the lockdown, especially at the beginning, was the right measure to take. May 25, RIAS Zoom Talks will resume on May 26th with a focus on how Germany has handled the coronavirus crisis compared to other countries hit harder.

The conversations will be held on the Zoom platform and will be on-the-record unless otherwise stated beforehand.

We hope these sessions insprire reflection and possibly ideas for stories as well as offer everyone an opportunity to think differently about some issues.

These are aimed at allowing participants to learn more about German and American issues and, above all, to connect you more closely to the RIAS Network.

Michael Gargiulo. So Gargiulo, a RIAS alumni and co-leader of the New York alumni chapter, urged his station to try to find other ways to report the story without always emphasizing the latest death figures at the top of the news bulletins.

These are remarkable stories of people who are doing remarkable things. Gargiulo, who also made a short video on his early morning routine to and at work, talked candidly about that and other issues such as changes at work and at home since the outbreak of the pandemic.

In a wide-ranging talk to about 30 RIAS alumni and candidates for future RIAS programs, Gargiulo also spoke about the changes he and his fellow New Yorkers are facing and will be facing for a long time to come.

Cities thrived because people loved that lifestyle. Gargiulo also noted that the coronavirus crisis had worsened some of the political and regional divisions inside the United States.

He said that New Yorkers are not always welcome in other states because of the high numbers of infected New Yorkers.

He told stories of some New Yorkers who had difficulties driving in Florida with their New York license plates and others who went out of their way to get rental cars with non-New York license plates.

So I always have to obey all the rules all the time. Write to info riasberlin. May 19, Beyer, who is also a RIAS Berlin Commission board member and travels to the United States on average once per month, said he was disheartened by recent opinion polls showing that German views of China are improving while opinions on the United States are declining.

We have to see how we can overcome some of the problems. Peter Beyer. United States on hold since March.

He said he is not sure whether conditions will allow him to travel to the United States again this year. He said he hoped talks for a free trade agreement could start as soon as possible.

They realised it was a big emergency and played by the rules for a long time. We had a lot of intensive care units, more than we needed it turns out.

We were well-equipped. We were not well- equipped with masks. We found a good proportionate way of restricting freedom rights and with lockdown restrictions.

I think it was a very good format. The federal government and the 16 regional governments coordinated their moves. It was very calmly managed.

The lockdown restrictions were not as harsh as in other parts of the world. It was time we started lifting the restrictions. It seems to me the situation will leave footprints and make changes that will be there in the transatlantic relations for some time.

Beyer also noted the US election campaign this year is a lot different than in the past years due to the pandemic. He said that in normal times, the high unemployment level and difficult economic situation in the United States would be a problem for the incumbent.

But he said that this year, with the pandemic looming, the situation is far from clear. He said it was important for Germans to keep in mind the November election would also be for Congress and not just a presidential race.

We sometimes criticise the U. We love the United States. I think everyone in parliament and the federal government knows how important the American friends are for our future, for our sheer existence and for our prosperity.

But sometimes these days our American friends give us a headache when we oftentimes seem to be aligned and with similar interests, such as in Iran, but we totally seem to disagree on the way to reach these aims.

We have similar interests with China. We sometimes take different approaches. The conversations will be held on Zoom and generally on-the-record unless otherwise stated.

Here are the guest speakers for the first two meetings next week:. Peter Beyer , a senior member of the German parliament, will talk about German-American.

Peter Beyer MdB. Peter is one of the most committed advocates of strong transatlantic relations with the United States in the Reichstag.

May 19, 4 p. May 21, 5 p. Berlin time 11 a. Many of the alumni shared stories about the situations at their networks, cities and states during the coronavirus crisis.

They also brainstormed about ideas for further virtual meetings on Zoom for alumni in both the United States and Germany. There were 18 alumni in one Zoom meeting on Saturday who talked about their November alumni program to Berlin around the time Germany celebrated the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Many in that alumni group had filed stories back home to their stations on the events in Berlin. There were 10 alumni in another Zoom meeting on Saturday who reminisced about their September program to Brussels, Cologne, Erfurt and Berlin.

Several of the fellows on that program have already moved onto to new jobs and two of those participants had in the meantime become fathers.

New York City alumni chapter meeting. The New York alumni had a lot of brainstorming ideas on possible guest speakers for future meetings with alumni — a wish list headed by such luminaries as former RIAS honorary chairman Phillip Murphy, who is now the governor of New Jersey.

There was also a virtual meeting on Friday of a senior editors group from November that travelled around Texas to learn more about border security and immigration — a hot issue in the state and across the country then as well as it is now.

There were five participants from that small group and they even managed to clink their glasses in a virtual toast to each other at one point.

More details on that and other virtual talks will be announced soon. May 2, Twelve American journalists who took part in a RIAS program to Germany in reconnected for a virtual online reunion on Saturday from locations across the United States in three different time zones.

Jessica Prater. Determined not to let the coronavirus crisis get in the way, the 12 Americans from the fall of group came together for a virtual meeting on Zoom for more than two hours.

They shared stories of how they and their TV or radio stations or media outlets are dealing with the Covid lockdown and how they have been in the 18 months since their two-week tour of Brussels, Cologne, Mainz and Berlin in September Bryan Weakland.

The group that bonded so well during the RIAS program in Europe has stayed in contact over the last 18 months through their WhatsApp group — sharing news of career moves, important stories they were working on, their travels and some of their family developments among lots of other things.

Latese Clark. The idea caught on fire and all 12 members of their group quickly agreed to take part.

Isabelle Körner Video

Bilanzpressekonferenz 2014: Interview mit Thomas Rabe Isabelle Körner

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